Ulysses for All

Ulysses for All 2022

Online Course Spring Summer 2022

Read Ulysses by James Joyce in 2022! Join our global readership (and guest speakers) for an online odyssey from the James Joyce Centre this Spring where the 10th edition of ‘Ulysses for All’, led by Dubliner and Joycean, Dr. Caroline Elbay will celebrate the centenary of Joyce’s great Dublin epic.  A carnival of language (and linguistic styles) and a celebration of existence, Ulysses deals with (but is not limited to) sex, alcohol, adultery, identity (in all its forms), life, death, religion, and guilt.

The course is a live zoom session for 18 weeks on Wednesday evenings from 6pm – 8pm.
Start Date: 2/2/2022
End Date: 8/6/2022
Fee: €140

To critics who found the book unreadable and/or obscene, Joyce simply replied “If Ulysses isn’t fit to be read, then life isn’t fit to be lived”.

This year’s course will celebrate the Book of Bloom: Joyce’s Wandering Womanly Jew “My beloved subjects, a new era is about to dawn…ye shall ere long enter into the golden city…the new Bloomusalem in the Nova Hibernia of the future”  (U15: 1542-44)

When Jacques Mercanton posed the question to James Joyce regarding the placing of Bloom as the central figure in Ulysses, the response emphasised not only Bloom’s ‘Jewishness’ but also his ‘foreigness’: “Bloom Jewish?  Yes, because only a foreigner would do”.  The Jews were ‘foreigners’ in Dublin at that time.  There was no hostility towards them but contempt, yes, the contempt people always show for the unknown (Nadel).   This is one of many aspects that make Ulyssesperhaps even more relevant today than when it was originally written.  In an increasingly globalised world where migration, trans-nationalism, and the emergence of nation states (and nationalism) are an everyday reality, any investigation of the character, Bloom, is ultimately an investigation of both individual and social identity (along with all its attendant concerns and prejudices) in a world where ‘foreigness’ has become an intimate and everyday reality.

***Places are limited, so early booking is advised***

Continue reading

Painting Ulysses

James Joyce


Painting Ulysses is an exhibition based on the 18 episodes of James Joyce’s novel. The works, painted by Aidan Hickey to mark the 100th Anniversary of Ulysses’ publication, will hang in the James Joyce Centre, North Great George’s Street, Dublin, from February to June, 2022.

Since each of Joyce’s episodes was written in a different literary style, Hickey designed each painting in a different visual style. This exhibition responds to both the text of Ulysses and an eclectic exploration of European Art History.

Aidan Hickey studied at the National College of Art and spent most of his career drawing and writing animated films for Children’s TV. Always keen to tell visual stories, he worked in a Narrative style and searched for a suitable subject. And, about six years ago he found it, in Ulysses. Today, looking at the finished paintings, he says,

“Pictures can convey a lot of the spirit of a written episode, but very little of its true significance. That said, even if my paintings only hint at the novel’s wealth of comedy and complexity, they might, for a new audience, become a silent “Open Sesame” to Joyce’s treasure trove.”

Continue reading

Budgen Collection

The Budgen Collection


Budgen and Joyce

Frank Budgen (1882 – 1971) was an English writer and painter who lived in Switzerland during the First World War. He met James Joyce in Zurich in 1918, after their mutual friend, Horace Taylor, insisted that they meet. Over the next two years, Budgen and Joyce met almost daily to walk, talk, and drink wine. During these meetings they discussed Ulysses, the novel Joyce was then writing. In his memoir James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, Budgen describes the first time he met Joyce.

“I saw a tall slender man come into the garden through the restaurant. Swinging a thin cane he walked deliberately down the steps to the gravelled garden path. He was a dark mass against the orange light of the restaurant glass door, but he carried his head with the chin uptilted so that his face collected cool light from the sky. His walk as he came slowly across to us suggested that of a wading heron.”

The two developed a strong bond and friendship, one so comfortable and trusting that Joyce used Budgen as a sounding board while writing many of his great works, most notably Ulysses. Over the years, Budgen amassed a large library of works written by and about Joyce, and went on to write his own account of their friendship. He detailed their friendship in his memoirs and continued to collect books and other materials relating to Joyce. Many of the items he received contain handwritten notes from the authors, including Joyce himself.

In 2012, his daughter, Joan Budgen, donated a portion of his library to the James Joyce Centre. The collection includes 23 books and related ephemera, 3 original sketches, and 1 audio tape cassette.

“The books…came from the library of my father, Frank Budgen, and, when he died in 1971, I inherited them. He was a close friend of James Joyce, especially during the years of the writing of Ulysses in Zurich, about which he wrote in James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses.” Joan Budgen, 25 July 2012






Continue reading

Paul Léon Furniture

Paul Léon Furniture


“As one grew to know him, one became as it were enveloped by a fine network of half-expressed thoughts and feelings that created an atmosphere of such suavity that it was difficult to resist, all the more so since it contained no element of restraint.”
Paul Léon on James Joyce

The James Joyce Centre Dublin is home to a table and four armchairs that came from the apartment of Joyce’s friend Paul Léon in Paris. Here Joyce was an almost daily visitor from 1928-1939.

Paul Léon was a Russian Jewish émigré who left Russia after the Revolution and came to settle in Paris in the 1920s with his wife Lucie. He was a lawyer, philosopher and sociologist who had published two books. James Joyce and Paul Léon first met through Giorgio’s friend Alex Ponisovsky, Léon’s brother in law, who was giving Joyce lessons in Russian. In the early 1930s, Léon took over as Joyce’s unpaid secretary looking after most of his legal and literary correspondence. When Joyce was writing Finnegans Wake, bad eyesight and general ill health made the task of birthing ‘the monster’ even more difficult. Léon’s help, was indispensable.

Joyce and Léon met regularly with others to work on the text. Towards the end of November 1931, Philippe Soupault joined the group which met each Thursday at 2.30pm in Léon’s apartment on the rue Casimir Perier. They would use the table and chairs that you see in the exhibition, and read the English and French texts of Finnegans Wake. Léon would regularly threaten to sell the round table if Joyce would only inscribe his name upon it.

Their relationship was typified by the following correspondence when Joyce wrote a note to thank Léon for his help in April 1930, Léon replied

“One thing I do object to, it is in your thanks to me which I do feel I cannot ever thank you enough for having allowed me to observe the formation of your thoughts which is, I confess, both captivating and meaningful”.

After the Joyces fled Paris in 1940, Léon salvaged the family’s belongings and dispersed them among friends for safe-keeping for the duration of the war. Léon was arrested by the Gestapo in 1941 and died in a concentration camp in Silesia in 1942, but it was thanks to his efforts that the Joyces’ possessions survived the war.

Joyce recorded his own appreciation of Léon in Herbert Gorman’s biography:

“For the last dozen years, in sickness or health, night and day, he [Léon] has been an absolutely disinterested and devoted friend and I could never have done what I did without his help.”

This exhibition now recreates the apartment to pay tribute to this extraordinary friendship. The James Joyce Centre gratefully acknowledges the support of Alex Léon, The Heritage Council, The Office of Public Works and Mr. Danis Rose.

Exhibition at the James Joyce Centre

Continue reading

Podcast Last Year in France

Podcast Last Year in France


Et Voilá ! Franco Irish podcast channel sponsored by the Cultural section of the French Embassy in Ireland. The 2 episodes talk about James Joyce last year in St Gérand le Puy in France with Marion Byrne from Association de James Joyce in St Gérand, Darina Gallagher Director in James Joyce Centre, Dr Adrian Paterson NUI Galway, Catherine Gagneux French Hon Consul Connacht & Donegal

Contributors: Olwen Fouéré reading and performance of Tutto e Scoilto and Finnegans Wake, Paraic Breathnach reading and performance of Flower to my Daughter and The Night piece, Aindreas Muldowney Reading of correspondanc, Laure Terchair/ Laure Chartier music for Tutto e Scoilto, Alan Preims Soundcast and Podcast Galway for Recording, editing, music composed

Listen to James Joyce’s Last Year In France Part One by Et Voilà ! on #SoundCloud

Listen to James Joyce’s Last Year In France Part Two by Et Voilà ! on #SoundCloud

Continue reading

The Bloomsday Poem

The Bloomsday Poem


Each year the James Joyce Centre has the honour of commissioning a poem for Bloomsday. For Bloomsday 2021, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne created the beautiful – Lower Drumcondra. The Irish Times filmed Darina Gallagher, Director of the James Joyce Centre reading the poem.

Watch the Reading

LOWER DRUMCONDRA

Griffith Park has beauty.
Willows, dandelions
And tumbling chestnuts
Choirs of children laughing.
In the bubbling river
a heron always stands
Watching, on a rock,
Like any artist.

These shining slopes
Are built upon a dump.
Once the Millmount hills
Were lumps of rubbish,
mouldy offal,Micky Mud.
How it must have stunk.

He spread his wings
And headed south
Through Dorset Street
and Eccles.
North Richmond which is blind.
And on and on
and on.

Sixteen moves
Before he reached the boat.
Not quite a house for every year.
But close.

When he was twelve
He lived on the riverside
He saw the heron,
legs delicate and long,
Enchanting midstream
In the land of tundish.

She stands in the river still
Sublime upon her rock
Listening to the best English
The ardent river song.

The Joyce’s house is gone.

About the poet 

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne was born in Dublin in 1954 and is a graduate of UCD.

She lived for one year in Copenhagen, and otherwise has always lived in Dublin. She has two grown up sons and two grandchildren.

Eilis went to school to Scoil Bhríde, now in Ranelagh, and to Scoil Chaitríona, on Eccles Street. Then she studied at UCD, for almost ten years. She focused on literature and narrative studies, studying Pure English for the BA, doing an M Phil in Middle English and Old Irish, and finishing in 1982 with a Ph.D., dealing with the relationship of oral and written narrative. From 1978-9 she studied at the Folklore Institute in the University of Copenhagen as a research scholar, while researching her doctoral thesis.

Eilis worked in various jobs while she was studying – in Greene’s Bookshop, as a still room waitress on the Isle of Wight and on the Friesian Islands, in St James’s Hospital as a nurse’s assistant. For many years she worked as an assistant keeper, a librarian, in the National Library of Ireland. She has been lecturer in Creative Writing in UCD, and Writer Fellow at Trinity College. She was Burns Scholar at Boston College for Fall 2020.

She started writing short stories when she was a student and published her first story in the New Irish Writing Page in the Irish Press, in 1974 (the story was called ‘Green Fuse’), under the pseudonym Elizabeth Dean. For about ten years she wrote occasional short stories, many of which were published in the Irish Press.  Her first collection of stories was published in 1988, Blood and Water, and since then she has written 25 books, including  novels, collections of short stories, several books for children, plays and non-fiction works. She writes in both Irish and English. A list of the books is available on this website: see PUBLICATIONS on the menu on the left of the front page.

She has won several awards for her writing over the years. Among them are The Bisto Book of the Year Award, the Readers’ Association of Ireland Award, the Stewart Parker Award for Drama, the Butler Award for Prose from the Irish American Cultural Institute and several Oireachtas awards for novels and plays in Irish. The novel The Dancers Dancing was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. In 2015 she was awarded the Irish PEN award for an outstanding contribution to Irish literature, and in 2016 she was given a Hennessy Hall of Fame award for lifetime achievement.  Her stories are widely anthologized and translated. Her latest novel for young people, Aisling, was published in 2015; her Selected Stories were published in 2017 by Dalkey Archive Press, and a memoir, Twelve Thousand Days, in 2018. She recently published a collection of short stories, Little Red and Other Stories (Blackstaff Press 2020.

She was elected to Aosdána, the academy of Irish writers and artists, in 2004. She is a current ambassador for the Irish Writers’ Centre, and President of the Folklore of Ireland Society (An Cumann le Béaloideas Éireann).

Éilís Ní Dhuibhne

Continue reading

Test Post

James Joyce


James Joyce (1882 – 1941) is one of Ireland’s most influential and celebrated writers. His most famous work is Ulysses (1922) which follows the movements of Leopold Bloom through a single day on June 16th, 1904. Some of Joyce’s other major works include the short story collection Dubliners (1914), and novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939).

Joyce was born in Dublin on 2nd February 1882 at 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, Ireland. Joyce’s father was John Stanislaus Joyce and his mother was Mary Jane “May” (née Murray). He was the eldest of 10 children.

He attended school in Clongowes Wood College and Belvedere College (just up the road from the Centre) before going on to University College, then located on St Stephen’s Green, where he studied modern languages.

After graduating from university, Joyce went to Paris, ostensibly to study medicine, and was recalled to Dublin in April 1903 because of the illness and subsequent death of his mother. He stayed in Ireland until 1904, and in June that year he met Nora Barnacle, the Galway woman who was to become his partner and later his wife.

In August 1904 the first of Joyce’s short stories was published in the Irish Homestead magazine, followed by two others, but in October Joyce and Nora left Ireland going first to Pola (now Pula, Croatia) where Joyce got a job teaching English at a Berlitz school. After he left Ireland in 1904, Joyce only made four return visits, the last of those in 1912, after which he never returned to Ireland.

James Joyce in the Dublin garden of
Constantine Curran in 1904.

James Joyce photographed with
his Grandson Stephen in 1934.

Continue reading

Burns Night

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?

Walking Tours

Visit the James Joyce Centre


The James Joyce Cultural Centre can be found just around the corner from Dublin’s north city centre, O’Connell Street. It is situated in a stunning Georgian townhouse and offers the visitor historical and biographical information about James Joyce and his influence in literature. See the door to the famous No 7 Eccles Street from “Ulysses”, art exhibitions and more to bring the author and his works to life. With the help of our free audio guides in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish, interactive displays and knowledgeable walking tour guides, you will discover a piece of the literary history of Dublin. Our walking tours appeal to visitors with a casual interest and Joycean experts alike while our shop has a great selection of books by and on Joyce as well as other Joycean memorabilia. We run monthly evening lectures between September and June. Private walking tours and group tours and workshops are available for which advanced booking is necessary. Only the ground floor of the Centre is wheelchair-accessible.

Book a Visit

Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

“Our guide was brilliant- well spoken, knowledgeable, and
very passionate. Such a fantastic experience for anyone
visiting Dublin and I would highly recommend it!”

Trip advisor, Georgia  Feb 2020

Walking Tours


Our walking tours appeal to visitors with a casual interest and Joycean experts alike. They give a wonderful insight into the life and literature of James Joyce and explore our unique location at the heart of Joyce’s Dublin.

  • The usual rate for a walking tour is €12 for adults and €10 for students and seniors.
  • All tours depart from the James Joyce Centre and last 90 minutes.
  • Ireland is known for its rain, so please wear appropriate waterproof clothing.
  • Bookings for walking tours are non-refundable.

Introducing Joyce’s Dublin Walking Tour

Though Joyce lived most of his life outside of Ireland, Dublin would provide the backdrop for virtually all of his work. On a stroll around the north inner city, our guide will explain the real-life inspiration behind some of Joyce’s most celebrated writing and will show just how central the streetscape of the ‘Hibernian metropolis’ is to the author’s life and art. The tour visits stops such as Joyce’s alma mater, Belvedere College; North Hardwicke Street, the setting of the short story ‘The Boarding House’; The Gresham Hotel, the setting of the final and most memorable scene of the short story ‘The Dead’; and the James Joyce Statue on North Earl Street, affectionately known as the ‘Prick with the Stick’. The tour also includes a visit to the site of one of the most famous addresses in English literature, No. 7 Eccles Street, and retraces the steps of Leopold Bloom’s celebrated journey to buy a pork kidney in the fourth episode of Ulysses. This tour ends on O’Connell Street. 

Book This Tour

Quis autem vel eum iure repre henderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae con.

Dubliners Walking Tour

Joyce once referred to Dublin as the ‘centre of paralysis’, a city that he felt was backward and repressive in contrast to the modern capitals of Europe. This idea found its expression in Dubliners, a short story collection that illustrates the effects of this restrictive atmosphere on the city’s population. Join our guide on a walk that visits some of the key locations from both the collection and the author’s life, discussing all the while Joyce’s critical portrayal of the social, religious and political landscape of his home town. This tour also gives some insight into the publication history of the collection, itself a story that creates a sense of Joyce’s artistic mission and his controversial approach to writing about Dublin. This tour ends around O’Connell Street. 

Book This Tour

Sed quia consequuntur
magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt

Footsteps of Leopold Bloom Walking Tour

The ‘Lestrygonians’ episode of Ulysses sees Leopold Bloom make his way through the city centre on his way from Middle Abbey Street to the National Library. As he begins to feel the rumblings of hunger, his thoughts become centred on the social, political cultural and religious significance of food; as he goes on to think, food underlies all relations to the extent that ‘peace and war depend on some fellow’s digestion’. Bloom’s musings on the importance of food are mixed with a commentary on the architecture that surrounds him, emphasising Dublin’s position as a colonial city. Join our guide as we follow in Bloom’s footsteps and discuss these thoughts, focusing on Joyce’s effort to bring the unsavoury workings of the body into a work of art and use food as the basis of a political and social commentary. This tour ends on Kildare Street. 

Book This Tour

Consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt sed quia

Group Visits


The James Joyce Centre offers various options for group visits. If there are 10 or more of you, why not avail of our group rates? Please find descriptions of the options below as well as rates and terms and conditions for 2020. Due to limited capacity in the Centre, groups must book in advance to ensure availability.

Here is an overview of what is available for groups:

Visits to the James Joyce Centre

The main permanent exhibition is self-guided and focuses on Ulysses, but also deals with other aspects of Joyce’s life and work. The exhibition contains video documentaries, room reconstructions and computer installations. You can also see the door of No 7 Eccles Street, the home of Leopold Bloom in Ulysses, and the furniture from Paul Léon’s apartment, where Joyce wrote part of Finnegans Wake. In addition, we host temporary exhibitions inspired by Joyce, his life and works.

Group admission to the Centre is €3.50 for students/seniors and €4.50 for adults.

Book a Group Visit

Consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt sed quia

Walking Tours

The Centre offers walking tours to suit all levels of interest in Joyce, from those who have little or no knowledge of Joyce to those who are more familiar with his life and work and want to explore the city he wrote about. We can also tailor tours to specific interests.

Prices start from €10 for students/seniors and €12 for adults. Tours usually last from 60-90 minutes. For more details visit our Private Walking Tours or Student Walking Tours pages.

Book a Group Walking Tour

Workshops

We offer workshops and tours at the Centre for groups studying works by James Joyce. The students will be led in a discussion which will touch on different aspects of the chosen text and we hope to be able to introduce them to unfamiliar aspects, so they go back to the text again with different eyes.

All our group offers can be tailored specifically to the needs and interests of individual groups. You can also combine different elements and we offer special discounted rates for combinations of visits, walks and workshops.

Consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt sed quia

GROUP RATES 2020


  • Group Admission for self-guided visit to Centre: €3.50 per student or senior (60+); €4.50 per adult; guides/teachers free of charge (see Terms & Conditions below).
  • Group Walking Tours of Joyce’s Dublin. Duration approximately 90 minutes. €10 per student/senior; €12 per adult with a minimum rate of €100. Tours range in suitability from those learning English to those studying Joyce’s works.
  • Student tours comprising of in-house presentation followed by short walking tour. Two student tours are available: “Introducing James Joyce” and “Dubliners.” Duration approximately 60 minutes. €10 per student with a minimum rate of €100 per group.
  • Customised Student Workshops. Duration approximately 45 minutes. From €8 per student with a minimum rate of €80 per group.

    TERMS & CONDITIONS 2020


    • A group consists of 10 or more persons. Groups must be accompanied by a group leader for the duration of the visit/tour. Group leaders are responsible for their group throughout the duration of the visit/tour. Group leaders are free of charge up to a maximum of one leader per ten persons.
    • Groups must book in advance – at least 7 days’ notice is required for group admissions and four weeks’ notice for walking tours or workshops, subject to availability.
    • Maximum group size is 25 persons. Proposed groups over 25 persons will be split into smaller groups to visit separately at different times.
    • The James Joyce Centre reserves the right to refuse admission at its discretion.

    Opening Hours


    October – March

    Mondays: Closed from
    1st October – 31st March
    Tuesday to Saturday:
    10am – 5pm
    Sundays: 12 – 5pm

    April – September

    Monday to Saturday:
    10am – 5pm
    Sunday: 12 – 5pm

    Last admissions are at 4.30pm and our exhibitions close at 4.50pm.


    Admission to the Centre, including temporary exhibitions:
    Adults: €5
    Students/Concession: €4


    Group rates (10 persons or more)
    Adults: €4.50
    Students/Concession: €3.50
    Group payments must be made in a single transaction.


    If you are a tour group that is interested in visiting the James Joyce Centre be sure to contact us on [email protected] or +353 (0)1 8788547 to discuss your visit. Due to limited capacity in the Centre, groups must book in advance to ensure availability.

    How to Get Here

    The James Joyce Centre is located on North Great George’s Street which is close to O’Connell Street in Dublin 1. O’Connell Street is serviced by most main bus routes that pass through the centre of Dublin.

    The centre is also close to Parnell Square and the Parnell Street LUAS stop. Connolly Station is a close walking distance (5 – 10mins) to the Centre for DART and commuter rail users.

    Continue reading

    Culture Night

    Song on the Steps! Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?